Payson Utah Temple

Payson Utah Temple

Payson Utah Temple, South 930 West, Payson, Utah, United States On July 14, 2010, City Planner Jill Spencer presented a staff report on the proposed South Meadows Annexation, which would extend the city boundaries of Payson to include 250 acres of land generally located between 1130 South and 1600 South and between Interstate 15 and 930 West, including the site of the Payson Utah Temple. The annexation sponsors requested acceptance in order to finalize donation of the temple site to the Church. Following annexation, the Nebo School District anticipates its own construction project—a new elementary school near the temple to accommodate growing population in the area. Planner Spencer noted that all property owners around the temple are supportive of the annexation and that staff is working to address their concerns. A motion to recommend approval of the South Meadows Annexation was carried.On July 21, 2010, City Manager Rich Nelson presented to the City Council a draft outline of a Request for Proposal (RFP) for a master plan for the area surrounding the temple. He explained the need for the plan including assurance that traffic would flow well among Walmart, the Woodbury property, the temple, and the transportation area. A motion carried to approve the RFP but to increase the amount from $30,000 to $50,000 and to have staff prepare another RFP to include hire of a temporary planner.On August 4, 2010, City Attorney Dave Tuckett explained that an RFP had not been put out as approved in the previous meeting because Mountainland Association of Government had been contacted to see if its services could be utilized on the project. He indicated that resources were available to assist with boundary coordination with Santaquin and that a coordination of resources from the Church may also be available. The Council agreed to move in this direction. A public hearing was also held to receive input on the proposed South Meadows Annexation. Following presentation of the proposal, a short discussion was held, which focused largely on the rights to keep animals on the property. The City Council made a final decision regarding the annexation based on a review of all pertinent data and public input. No qualified protests to the annexation were received.On August 6, 2010, the deed conveying the temple site from the Denise Y. Dehart Revocable Trust to the Corporation of the Presiding Bishop of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints was officially recorded by Utah County.On April 6, 2011, students enrolled in the Masters of Business Administration program at Brigham Young University made a presentation to the City Council of their analysis of various land use and transportation proposals that may affect the general plan, including recommendations for the Payson City Temple Area. The students proposed residential development around the temple with lot sizes no smaller than 1/3 acre. They explained that low density housing was preferred because it followed the successful model of other temples and that it kept the area less crowded and more open. Their consultation with Church representatives confirmed the preference of residential.On December 14, 2011, the Payson City Planning Commission recommended approval of the applications for the temple including allowing a decorative steel fence along 930 West where solid fencing would normally be required. Although the landscaping plan did not include as many trees as required, it included a compensating number of plants and shrubbery—four times the mandated amount. Church project manager for the temple, Nate Perriton, said the goal is to create a sense of openness. The Commission also recommended allowing the Church to defer installment of sidewalks on the undeveloped portion of the property. www.ldschurchtemples.com The Payson Utah temple seen from above. Watch it in 4K! For more aerial videos go to danesdrone.com.

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